Yokohama, 26 June 2007 – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) welcomed the release of a new print, radio and television public service announcement (PSA) promoting the agency’s
school feeding programme, made possible with support of the Japan Advertising Council.

The PSA showcases WFP’s micronutrient-enriched biscuits, fortified with 14 essential minerals and vitamins and used as an integral part of the agency’s school feeding programme .

“Ticket to the future”

In the PSA, under the catch-phrase “a biscuit is a ticket to the future”, children’s desks are fabricated of WFP biscuits, illustrating how WFP’s school feeding programme is helping children
get a chance to learn in school.

“We are truly grateful to the Japan Advertising Council for their support of our school feeding initiatives,” said Mihoko Tamamura, Director, WFP Japan Relations Office.

“This PSA campaign will create an incredible impact in generating support among the people of Japan towards our efforts in wiping out child hunger from the world.”

Indonesia

The PSA was filmed in Indonesia, where malnutrition is widespread among school age children. Roughly half suffer from iron deficiency induced anaemia and marginal vitamin A deficiency, which
often results in poor cognitive performance. Recent studies found that the prevalence of anaemia dropped from 24% to 10% in children receiving WFP’s biscuits. Cognitive performance also
improved significantly.

One of the world’s largest advertising companies, Dentsu, designed and produced the new PSA. The TV and radio spots were narrated by the famous Japanese actor Kazunari Ninomiya, whose recent
performance in Clint Eastwood’s Oscar-winning “Letters from Iwo Jima” won widespread acclaim.

Common good

The new PSA will be broadcast on TV and radio and appear in print media and on billboards from the beginning of July. The Japan Advertising Council is dedicated to serving the common good
through PSA campaigns.

It is made up of over 1,300 voluntary corporate members, including media organizations, ad agencies, and other business enterprises from Japan. PSAs produced by the Council are printed and/or
aired free-of-charge by member media organizations.

School meals

WFP has been engaged in school feeding for more than 40 years and is the world’s largest provider of school meals in developing countries.

In poor countries, free, nutritious school meals attract children to school, as well as enhance their performance by allowing them to concentrate on their lessons. In 2006, WFP provided 20.2
million children with school meals in 71 countries and aims to reach 50 million children by the end 2008.

www.wfp.org